Blackoutlets Podcast EP5: Caille Millner

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From a very early age, San Francisco Chronicle columnist Caille Millner, has been a prolific writer whose primary source of inspiration has been her personal experience at the conflicting intersection of class, race, and gender here in America and abroad.

Growing up in Northern California, Millner consciously recognized the impact of racism and classism on her day-to-day life even as she struggled mightily to form a personal identity that balanced her fierce individuality and disdain for conformity with a pragmatic realization that race indelibly shapes the personal narrative of all Americans.

That tension is apparent even in Millner’s first published article, where, at the age of 16, Millner described in uncompromising detail the subtly pervasive racism and classism at her elite Catholic high school in the Bay Area.  After attending Harvard and becoming an award winning journalist, biographer, and world traveler, Millner wrote an autobiography at the age of 27.  The title of her autobiography, The Golden Road: Notes of My Gentrification, itself confirms Millner’s success at creating a voice that is simultaneously cognizant of the deeply pervasive influence of race while at the same time critical of those who assume that the experience of race is uniform and without space for personal agency.

In that respect, from her current position as a columnist and member of the editorial board for the San Francisco Chronicle,  Millner exemplifies the purpose of the Blackoutlets concept. In episode 5 of the Blackoutlets Podcast  Caille recounts how the profession of writing has changed and the opportunities and challenges associated with said change.

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